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Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy Part V

From the Breakfast Table, Hotel San Donato, Palazzo Malvasia, Via Zamboni, Bologna


Our Hire Car, Courtyard, Hotel San Donato (Palazzo Malvasia), Bologna


Piazza di Porta Ravegnana, Bologna


Piazza Maggiore, Bologna


Piazza Re Enzo, Bologna


Palazzo del Podestà, Piazza Re Enzo, Bologna


Piazza della Mercanzia, Bologna


View Along Via Rizzoli, Bologna


Via De’ Giudei, Bologna


LaFeltrinelli Librerie, Piazza di Porta Ravegnana, Bologna

(A Bookshop)


Doorway, 1 Piazza di Porta Ravegnana, Bologna


“Spiritus Intus Alit”, Basilica Santi Bartolomeo e Gaetano, Piazza di Porta Ravegnana, Bologna

(Main doorway and bas relief each side)

The Latin Inscription “Spiritus Intus Alit” Translates as- “Spirit within sustains”

Short guide to the Basilica of Saints Bartolomeo and Gaetano


Basilica Santi Bartolomeo e Gaetano, Piazza di Porta Ravegnana, Bologna


Carabinieri Cars, Via San Vitale, Bologna


Statue Of San Petronius, Piazza Di Porta Ravegnana, Bologna

Saint Petronius was bishop of Bologna during the fifth century. He is a patron saint of the city. Born of a noble Roman family, he became a convert to Christianity and subsequently a priest. As bishop of Bologna, he built the Church of Santo Stefano.


Medieval Building, Piazza di Porta Ravegnana, Bologna


Le Due Torri: Garisenda e degli Asinelli, Piazza di Porta Ravegnana, Bologna

See Street View!


Coat of Arms, Via Rizzoli, Bologna


Biblioteca Salaborsa, Piazza del Nettuno, Bologna


Gated Entrance, Palazzo Re Enzo, Piazza del Nettuno, Bologna

Take a Tour Inside


Ornate Street Lamp. Piazza del Nettuno, Bologna


Fontana Vecchia, Via Ugo Bassi, Bologna

By Sicilian Artist Tommaso Laureti 1565


Entrance, Cattedrale Metropolitana di San Pietro, Via dell’Indipendenza, Bologna


Staircase, Via dell’Indipendenza, Bologna


“Libertas”, Cnr Via Ghirlanda & Via Ugo Bassi, Bologna

(This sits above what is now a menswear shop)


Banco di Roma Clock, Via Ugo Bassi, Bologna


Hotel Carosello (B&B), 26 Via San Felice, Bologna


Arcade, 48 Via San Felice, Bologna


Doorway, Chiesa Parrocchiale di Santa Maria della Carità, Via San Felice, Bologna


Porta San Felice, Piazza di Porta San Felice, Bologna

Porta San Felice was the westernmost gate or portal of the former outer medieval walls of the city of Bologna, Italy. The gate was erected in the 13th century, and rebuilt in 1334 with a machiocolated tower and drawbridge. It was restored in 1508, and again in 1805 when Napoleon visited the city. In 1840, the flanking walls were torn down. A barracks and tax house for collecting duties was in the past found astride the entrance.


Doorway, 137 Via San Felice, Bologna


Door Furniture, 121 Via San Felice, Bologna



Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy Part III

Door, Via Zamboni, 57, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Door, Via Zamboni, 59, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Collezione di Mineralogia, Via Zamboni, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Door, Museo di Mineralogia L Bombicci, Via Zamboni, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Door, Museo di Mineralogia L Bombicci, Via Zamboni, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Convento Padri Agostiniani, Via Zamboni, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

Convent of the Augustinian Fathers – Basilica of San Giacomo Maggiore


Basilica of San Giacomo Maggiore, Piazza Gioacchino Rossini, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Chiesa di San Donato, Piazzetta Achille Ardigò, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Arcade, L’Accademia di Letteratura, Via Zamboni, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Entrance, Lifebrain Laboratorio Analisi, Via Zamboni, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Bricked Wall Niche, Via Zamboni, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

See on Google Street View


Old Doors, Via del Carro, 2, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Doors, Via Zamboni, 6, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Passageway, Piazza di Porta Ravegnana, 1, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Entrance Doors, Camera di Commercio Industria Artigianato e Agricoltura di Bologna, Palazzo della Mercanzia, Piazza della Mercanzia, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Gated Passage, Via Castiglione, 1, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Window Grille With Shields, Via Castiglione, 2, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Entrance, Palazzo Pepoli Vecchio, Via Castiglione, 8, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

A medieval palace now home to the Museo della Storia di Bologna – Museum of the History of Bologna.


Traffic Jam, Via Clavature, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

It’s very easy to get yourself into a situation such as this when trying to navigate these historic places.


Santuario di Santa Maria della Vita, Via Clavature, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

13th Century origins as church and a hospital. Current construction dates to 1687.


Trattoria da Gianni, Via Clavature, 18, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Narrow Street, Via de’ Musei, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Piazza Maggiore, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy




Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy Part II

Archway, Via Zamboni, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Via Zamboni, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Doorway, Città Metropolitana di Bologna, Palazzo Malvezzi, Via Zamboni, 13, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

See a “Virtual Tour” of the inside of this old palace.


Basilica di San Giacomo Maggiore, Piazza Gioacchino Rossini, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna. Italy

Construction of this historic church began in 1267 and was completed in 1315. It was consecrated in 1344.


Piazza Giuseppe Verdi, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Oratorio di Santa Cecilia, Piazza Giuseppe Verdi, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Doorway, Palazzo Gotti, Via Zamboni, 34, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Doorway, Palazzo Riario, Via Zamboni, 38, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Porta San Donato, Piazza Di Porta San Donato, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

Porta San Donato, also known as Porta Zamboni, was a gate or portal of the former outer medieval walls of the city of Bologna, Italy. It was a gate into the University area of the City.

The gate was built in the 13th-century, and by 1354 was equipped with a drawbridge. It was sealed in 1428, but reopened in the following decades.


Bollard, Via Castiglione, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna. Italy


Old Stone Steps, Via de’ Musei, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Wall Shrine, Back Streets, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy




Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy Part I

We hired a car from Florence for a drive to Bologna and what a trip. Magnificent.


Italian Countryside Panorama, Tuscany, Italy


Country Villas, Via Bolognese, Querceto, Tuscany, Italy


Castello di Villanova, Via Nazionale, Barberino di Mugello, Tuscany, Italy


Rural Ruins, Via Nazionale, Cafaggiolo, Tuscany, Italy


Misty Panorama, Via Nazionale, Cafaggiolo, Tuscany, Italy


“Warning”, Via Nazionale, Cafaggiolo, Tuscany, Italy


Panoramas, Futa Pass, Via Traversa Futa, Tuscan-Emilian Apennines, Tuscany, Italy


Ristorante Passo della Futa dal 1890, Futa Pass, Via Traversa Futa, Tuscan-Emilian Apennines, Tuscany, Italy


Panorama, Via Pietramala, Pietramala, Tuscany, Italy


Waterfall, Via Idice, Monterenzio, Tuscany, Italy


Building Ruin, Via Idice, Monterenzio, Tuscany, Italy


Hotel San Donato (Palazzo Malvasia), Piazzetta Achille Ardigò, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

[Our place of residence in Bologna]

The hotel is in an old but fully renovated Italian Palazzo – Palazzo Malvasia which dates to the 13th century.


The Two Towers, Via San Vitale, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

There are two towers and are commonly referred to as “Two Towers”. They date to the 13th century and are located at the intersection of the roads that lead to the five gates of the old ring wall (mura dei torresotti). It was located at the site of the early medieval Gate to the Via Emilia, the Porta Ravennate, now remembered by the name of the adjacent Piazza di Porta Ravegnana. The taller tower is called the Asinelli while the smaller but more leaning tower is called the Garisenda.


Church & Clock Tower, Via San Vitale, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Galleria del Leone, Piazza della Mercanzia, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Palazzo della Mercanzia, Piazza della Mercanzia, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Ferro da Facciata, Via Castiglione, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

A ferro (plural ferri) or ferro da facciata is an item of functional wrought-iron work on the façade of an Italian building. Ferri are a common feature of Medieval and Renaissance architecture in Lazio, Tuscany and Umbria. They are of three main types: ferri da cavallo have a ring for tethering horses, and are set at about 1.5 metres from the ground; holders for standards and torches are placed higher on the façade and on the corners of the building; arpioni have a cup-shaped hook or hooks to support cloth for shade or to be dried, and are set near balconies.

In Florence, ferri da cavallo and arpioni were often made to resemble the head of a lion, the symbolic marzocco of the Republic of Florence. Later, cats, dragons, horses and fantastic animals were also represented.

 

[See a collection of the wonderful features here]


Iron Bracket, Via Castiglione, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

View this on Google Street View!


Stairway Passage, Palazzo Pepoli Vecchio, Via Castiglione, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Vintage Street Lamp, Piazza del Francia, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

[See this place on Google Street View]


Stone Carved, Piazza del Francia, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy


Via de Pepoli, Bologna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy




Ferro da Facciata of Bologna & Florence

A ferro (plural ferri) or ferro da facciata is an item of functional wrought-iron work on the façade of an Italian building. Ferri are a common feature of Medieval and Renaissance architecture in Lazio, Tuscany and Umbria. They are of three main types: ferri da cavallo have a ring for tethering horses, and are set at about 1.5 metres from the ground; holders for standards and torches are placed higher on the façade and on the corners of the building; arpioni have a cup-shaped hook or hooks to support cloth for shade or to be dried, and are set near balconies.

In Florence, ferri da cavallo and arpioni were often made to resemble the head of a lion, the symbolic marzocco of the Republic of Florence. Later, cats, dragons, horses and fantastic animals were also represented.

(Wikipedia)