Greece 2019 Part XV


All images are geotagged and hyperlinked to open full screen. To view them on a map, save the image to your hard drive and then download this FREE SOFTWARE. Install and click on the image in the left panel to view in a map as to the location where it was taken.  (SAMPLE VIEW)


The final post from our Greek sojourn – next up will be Florence, Italy


Waterfront, Koróni, Greece

 

Koróni Castle, Koróni, Greece

 

Bollards, Waterfront, Koróni, Greece

 

Doors of Koróni, Greece

 

Laneways, Alleys & Streets of Koróni, Greece

 

Kamares Cafe Bar, Koróni, Greece

 

Memorial, Karapavlou, Koróni, Greece

 

Derelict Building, Koróni, Greece

 

Rachel Bakery, Koróni, Greece


The Corinth Canal

The Corinth Canal connects the Gulf of Corinth in the Ionian Sea with the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Sea. It cuts through the narrow Isthmus of Corinth and separates the Peloponnese from the Greek mainland, arguably making the peninsula an island. The canal was dug through the isthmus at sea level and has no locks. The canal consists of a single channel 8 metres (26 ft) deep, excavated at sea level (thus requiring no locks), measuring 6,343 metres (20,810 ft) long by 24.6 metres (81 ft) wide at sea level and 21.3 metres (70 ft) wide at the bottom. The rock walls, which rise 90 metres (300 ft) above sea level, are at a near-vertical 80° angle. The canal is crossed by a railway line, a road and a motorway at a height of about 45 metres (148 ft). In 1988 submersible bridges were installed at sea level at each end of the canal, by the eastern harbour of Isthmia and the western harbour of Poseidonia.

Although the canal saves the 700-kilometre (430 mi) journey around the Peloponnese, it is too narrow for modern ocean freighters, as it can accommodate ships only of a width up to 17.6 metres (58 ft) and draft up to 7.3 metres (24 ft). In October 2019, with over 900 passengers on board, a 22.5 metres (74 ft) wide and 195 metres (640 ft) long, Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines cruise ship successfully traversed the canal to set a new record for longest ship to pass through the canal. Ships can pass through the canal only one convoy at a time on a one-way system. Larger ships have to be towed by tugs. The canal is currently used mainly by tourist ships; around 11,000 ships per year travel through the waterway.

Submersible Bridge (Isthmia Bridge), Corinth Canal, Isthmus of Corinth, Greece

 

Corinth Canal

 

Art Installation, Palea EO Athinon Korinthou, Isthmia, Greece

 

Bungee Jumper Corinth Canal Old Bridge, Isthmia, Greece

 

Garden Gate, Petrou Papasideri, Markopoulo Mesogaias, Athens, Greece



Greece 2019 Part X


All images are geotagged and hyperlinked to open full screen. To view them on a map, save the image to your hard drive and then download this FREE SOFTWARE. Install and click on the image in the left panel to view in a map as to the location where it was taken.  (SAMPLE VIEW)


We have returned to mainland Greece and the map below shows the area where we will be spending a the next several days



Epar.Od. Rizomilou-Koronis, Charokopio, Koroni, Greece

 

Markets, Epar.Od. Rizomilou-Koronis, Charokopio, Koroni, Greece

 

Church of Agios Georgios, Epar.Od. Rizomilou-Koronis, Charokopio, Koroni, Greece

 

Local Transport, Epar.Od. Rizomilou-Koronis, Charokopio, Koroni, Greece

 

Doorways, Epar.Od. Rizomilou-Koronis, Charokopio, Koroni, Greece

 

Balcony, Epar.Od. Rizomilou-Koronis, Charokopio, Koroni, Greece

 

Koróni Waterfront, Koróni, Greece

 

Koroni Castle, Koroni. Greece

Koróni Marina, Koróni, Greece

 

Old Building on the Waterfront, Koróni Marina, Koróni, Greece

 

Waterfront, Koróni Marina, Koróni, Greece

 

Limestone Pillar, Koróni Marina, Koróni, Greece

 

Laneway, Koróni, Greece

 

Miranda’s Kitchen, Koróni, Greece

 

YiaMas Wine Shop, Koróni, Greece

 

Old Building, Koróni, Greece

 

Olive Grove, Koróni, Greece



Iceland 2019 Part IV

The walk around the main streets of Reykjavik continues..

Te & Kaffi, Laugavegur 27, Reykjavik, Iceland

Bicycle Road Barrier, Laugavegur, Reykjavik, Iceland

Sakebarinn Sushi & Sticks, Laugavegur 2, Reykjavik, Iceland

Laneway, Skólavörðustígur, Reykjavik, Iceland

Red Door, Skólavörðustígur 3A, Reykjavik, Iceland

Door, Skólavörðustígur 5, Reykjavik, Iceland

Red Door, Hotel Óðinsvé, Skólavörðustígur 7, Reykjavik, Iceland

Door, Skólavörðustígur 9, Reykjavik, Iceland

Front Gate, Skólavörðustígur 25, Reykjavik, Iceland

Purple Door, Skólavörðustígur 29, Reykjavik, Iceland

Hallgrímskirkja, Hallgrímstorg, Reykjavik, Iceland

Hallgrímskirkja is a Lutheran (Church of Iceland) parish church in Reykjavík, Iceland. It is one of the city’s best-known landmarks and is visible throughout the city. At 74.5 metres (244 ft) high, it is the largest church in Iceland and among the tallest structures in the country. The church is named after the Icelandic poet and clergyman Hallgrímur Pétursson (1614–1674), author of the Passion Hymns.

Architect Guðjón Samúelsson’s design of the church was commissioned in 1937 and is said to have been designed to resemble the trap rocks, mountains and glaciers of Iceland’s landscape.

It took 41 years to build the church: construction started in 1945 and ended in 1986, but the landmark tower being completed long before the whole church was completed. The crypt beneath the choir was consecrated in 1948, the steeple and wings were completed in 1974, and the nave was consecrated in 1986. At the time of construction, the building was criticised as too old-fashioned and as a blend of different architectural styles. The church was originally intended to be less tall, but the leaders of the Church of Iceland wanted a large spire so as to outshine Landakotskirkja (Landakot’s Church), which was the cathedral of the Catholic Church in Iceland.

Leifur Eiríksson Monument, Hallgrímskirkja, Hallgrímstorg, Reykjavik, Iceland

The statue of Leifur Eiríksson (who is known in English as Leif Eriksson) was a gift from the United States to Iceland to commemorate the 1000 year anniversary of Alþingi, the parliament of Iceland first convened at Þingvellir in the year 930 AD.

Roof Balcony, Tækniskólinn – Skólavörðuholti (Technical School), Frakkastígur, Reykjavik, Iceland

Public Toilet, Frakkastígur, Reykjavik, Iceland

Steps to Door, Frakkastígur 26, Reykjavik, Iceland

Rear Door & Steps, Grettisgata 26, Reykjavik, Iceland

Doorway, Frakkastigur 11, Reykjavik, Iceland

Carving, Mónakó, Laugavegur 78, Reykjavík, Iceland

Reykjavik Cathedral, Pósthússtræti , Reykjavik, Iceland

Cathedral church in Reykjavík, dating back to 1796 is the seat of the Bishop of Iceland and mother church of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Iceland, as well as the parish church of the old city centre and environs.

Bust, Reverend Bjarni Jónsson, Kirkjutorg, Reykjavik, Iceland

Bjarni Jónsson, minister in the Reykjavík Cathedral, ran for election to the post of President of Iceland in 1952. He was narrowly defeated by only 2.6% of the vote.

Skólabrú Restaurant, Skólabrú, Reykjavik, Iceland

One of Reykjavik’s finer restaurants, we had dinner here one night – they had Puffin on the menu!

1912 Guest House, Skólabrú, Reykjavik, Iceland