London, United Kingdom. 2019 VII

Entrance Gwydyr House, 26 Whitehall, Westminster, London, England UK

A mansion built in 1772 at a cast of £6,000. It is currently used as the Office of Secretary of State for Wales.

This entrance was featured as the fictional Department for Administrative Affairs in the BBC sitcom Yes Minister.

Cnr of Gwydyr House, 26 Whitehall, Westminster, London, England UK

Memorial to The Women of World War II, Whitehall, Westminster, London, England UK

Vintage Street Lamp, Whitehall, Westminster, London, England UK

(That’s “MONTY” in the background)

Gates, Ministry of Defence, Whitehall, Westminster, London, England UK

The Cenotaph, Whitehall, Westminster, London, England UK

The Cenotaph is a war memorial on Whitehall in London, England. Its origin is in a temporary structure erected for a peace parade following the end of the First World War, and after an outpouring of national sentiment it was replaced in 1920 by a permanent structure and designated the United Kingdom’s official national war memorial.

Close Parking, Police Vehicles, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Doorway to Former Grindlay’s Bank, 54 Parliament Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Doorway, 53 Parliament Street, Westminster, London, England UK

The Red Lion, Cnr Parliament Street & Derby Gate, Westminster, London, England UK

Empty Coffee Cup, The Red Lion, Cnr Parliament Street & Derby Gate, Westminster, London, England UK

Triple Arched Bridge Entrance to King Charles Street, Parliament Street, Westminster, London, England UK

This enclosed bridge, added in 1908 , links the New Government Offices (Treasury) of 1898 and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office of 1875.

Street Sign, Parliament Street – Whitehall SW1, Westminster, London, England UK

Doorway, Foreign & Commonwealth Office, Parliament Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Window Pillar, Foreign & Commonwealth Office, Parliament Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Entrance to Downing Street, Westminster, London, England UK

(Residence of the Prime Minister)

Mounted Police Patrol, Parliament Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Sign to Cabinet War Rooms, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Doorway, Foreign & Commonwealth Office, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Ornate Railing, Foreign & Commonwealth Office, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Gate, Foreign & Commonwealth Office, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Doorknob, Government Building, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Doorway, Government Building, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Vintage Street Lamp, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

“Clive of India”, Clive Steps, King Charles Street, Westminister, London, England UK

Major-General Robert Clive, 1st Baron Clive, KB, FRS (29 September 1725 – 22 November 1774), was the first British Governor of the Bengal Presidency. He began as a British military officer and East India Company (EIC) official who established the military and political supremacy of the EIC by seizing control of Bengal and eventually the whole of the Indian subcontinent and Myanmar.

The statue was unveiled in 1912 outside Gwydyr House, also in Whitehall, and was moved to its current location in 1916.

Institution of Civil Engineers, Great George Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Street, Sign. Great George Street SW1, Westminster, London, England UK

The Westminster Arms, Storey’s Gate, Westminster, London, England UK

Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England UK

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