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ENGLAND 2023 – VII – The Cotswolds (III)

Still in the Cotswolds just driving around.


Entrance Gates, Westonbirt School, Bath Road, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England UK

Built in 1853 it became a school in 1928.


“The Street”, Westonbirt, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England UK


Residence, “The Street”, Westonbirt, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England UK


Bridge at By Brook, Germaine’s Lane, Colerne, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK

By Brook also known as Bybrook River Is 12 mile long tributary of the Bristol Avon.


While driving around by myself, I stumbled into an absolutely stunning little village. The village boast 91 Listed buildings with several valued in the millions of pounds.


Elm Lodge, The Green, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK

Elm Lodge, The Green is a 5 bedroom freehold detached house – it is ranked as the 2nd most expensive property in the village, with a valuation of £2,439,000.


Duck Pond, Cross Keys Road, Biddestone, Wiltshire, England UK


The White Horse, The Green, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK

The pub is a Grade II listed building dating from the 1700s


Willow House, The Green, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK

A grade II listed building dated 1730.


The Close, The Green, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK

A Grade II Listed Building dating from the 1700s and largely reconstructed in 1924.


Elm Farm House, The Green, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK

A Grade II listed building – Farmhouse, now two houses, late C17 and early C18, much rebuilt c1975.


Street Sign, Church Road, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK


Village Water Pump, Church Road, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK


Church of St Nicholas, St Nicholas Circle, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK

Church. c880 AD, possibly then cathedral, reputed to be on site of a Roman temple, and incorporating much Roman masonry and brickwork. C11, C12, C16, altered 1829-30,1875-6 and 1888-9, restored 1904-5.


Roadside Stone Wall, The Butts, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK


Gatepost, The Old Rectory, The Butts, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK

The carving of the name is still visible in the stonework


Driveway, The Old Rectory, The Butts, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK


Bricked Up Doorways, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK


Cuttle Lane, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK


A Private Lane, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK

Access to:-
The Little House
Paddock House
Meadowside
Greenacre
Stable Cottage
Newstone House

See Street View Here!


Willowbrook, Cnr Harts Lane & The Green, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK


Gable Cottage (L) & Hawthorne Cottage (R), The Green, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK

Both are Grade II Listed Buildings


Twitten Bend, Cross Keys Road, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK

Grade II Listed Building from late 17th / early 18th century.


Laneway, Cross Keys Road, Biddestone, Chippenham, WIltshire, England UK


Heritage Residence, Cross Keys Road, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wiltshire, England UK


Door, Wickham Cottage, Cross Keys Road, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wilstshire, England UK

A Grade II Listed Building early 18th century


Door, The Malthouse, Cross Keys Road, Biddestone, Chippenham, Wilstshire, England UK

A Grade II Listed Building early 18th century that was a malthouse in the 19th century


Local Resident, Lowebourne, Melksham, Wiltshire, England UK


ENGLAND 2023 – IV

Lunch at the wonderfully historic Waggon & Horses Pub in Marlborough then a visit to the Avebury Henge and Stone Circles (See previous post)


Waggon and Horses, Beckhampton, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England UK

Originally a 17th-century house, two storeys in stone with a thatched roof, is now the Waggon and Horses pub; additions in the late 19th century and early 20th are described as picturesque by Historic England.




Inside the Waggon and Horses


Field Gates on Pathway to Avebury Henge & Stone Circles, Avebury, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England UK


Pathway to Avebury Henge & Stone Circles, Avebury, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England UK


Old Shed, Pathway to Avebury Henge & Stone Circles, Avebury, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England UK


Raindrops, Avebury Henge & Stone Circles, Avebury, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England UK


Back Yard Garden GateYard Gate, Pathway to Avebury Henge & Stone Circles, Avebury, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England UK


 

ENGLAND 2023 – II

Signs and Posters of some of the many pubs and bars seen during the drive around UK. Sadly, I did not get experience the atmosphere in each and every one.


The Greyhound, Hampton Street, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England UK


The Snooty Fox, Market Place, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England UK


West Country Ales, The Crown, Gumstool Hill, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England UK


The Crown, Gumstool Hill, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England UK


WH Smith & Son, Castle Street, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, England UK

Not a pub but a great hanging sign…


The Crown, West Market Place, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, England UK


The White Horse, Cross Keys Road, Biddestone, Gloucestershire, England UK


Biddestone Arms, Cross Keys Road, Biddestone, Gloucestershire, England UK


Parsons Nose, High Street, Melksham, Gloucestershire, England UK


The Old Bell Hotel, Abbey Row, Malmesbury, Wiltshire, England UK


The Kings Arms, High Street, Malmesbury, Wiltshire, England UK


The Smoking Dog, High Street, Malmesbury, Wiltshire, England UK


The Black Horse, Castle Street, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, England UK


The Crown, Black Jack Street, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, England UK


The Golden Cross, Black Jack Street, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, England UK


The Marlborough Arms, Sheep Street, Cirencester, Gloucestshire, England UK


The Royal British Legion, Market Street, Hay-on-Wye, Powys, Wales UK


The Black Boy (Buoy) Inn, Stryd Pedwar a Chwech, Caernarfon, Gwynedd, Wales UK

Prior to 1828, the pub was known as the ‘Black Boy’. Though still referred to by its traditional name, it was officially altered to the ‘King’s Arms’ and, later, the ‘Fleur de Lys’, until a change of ownership led to the restoration of the old name and the creation of the “Black Boy Inn” as it is today. The Inn signs each show a ‘black buoy’ on one side and a ‘black boy’ on the other.

The Inn’s name has caused controversy and there are at least three theories to explain its name. One is believed to come from a ‘black buoy’ which existed in the harbour in the early days of the Inn. Another refers to the nickname given to Charles II by his mother Henrietta Maria of France because of the darkness of his skin and eyes, as well as the fact that Royalists met at the Inn secretly at that time. Later, the place became the local fishermen’s favourite drinking place and the name of ‘black boy’ may come from this period.

In Caernarfon’s heyday as a port-town, Northgate Street – on which the Black Boy Inn is situated – was the heart of the red-light district. Northgate Street’s Welsh name Stryd Pedwar a Chwech translates to “Four [shillings] and Six [pence] Street”: what the sailors are reputed to have paid for a room, a bottle of gin, and the services of a woman for the night.

The ‘North Gate’ archway found at the end of Northgate Street was added in or about the 1820s. It was designed to help facilitate the flow of traffic in and out of the old town, and is not part of the original town wall design. Prior to the ‘North Gate’ archway, a census carried out in 1794 revealed this street was commonly referred to as ‘Black Boy’ street. The earliest reference to the “Black Boy” can be found in Caernarfon’s archives dated 1717, a Deed of Sale of a house in “Street Y Black Boy” between Thomas Wynne, Glynllifon and a Henry Robyns.

The ghost of a nun is said to pass through the inn on her way to a nunnery that was once situated at the rear.

The pub is a listed building.


The Palace Vaults, Stryd Pedwar a Chwech, Caernarfon, Gwynedd, Wales UK

Stryd Pedwar a Chwech is Welsh for Fourth & Sixth Street


The Crown, High Street, Caernarfon, Gwynedd, Wales UK

Y Goron is Welsh for The Crown


Tŷ Dre, High Street, Caernarfon, Gwynedd, Wales UK

Tŷ Dre is Welsh for Town House – Our accommodation for a couple of days in Caernarfon


Welsh Brewers The Black Boy, Tŷ Dre, High Street, Caernarfon, Gwynedd, Wales UK


Y Twll yn y Wal, Hole in the Wall Street, Caernarfon, Gwynedd, Wales UK

Y Twll yn y Wal is Welsh for The Hole in The Wall


Tafarn Y Porth, Greengate Street, Caernarfon, Gwynedd, Wales UK

Tafarn Y Porth  is Welsh for Porth Pub


Morgan Lloyd, Castle Square, Caernarfon, Gwynedd, Wales UK


Guinness Sign, Bar Bach, Tan y Bont, Caernarfon, Gwynned, Wales UK


Happy Hour Sign, Bar Bach, Tan y Bont, Caernarfon, Gwynned, Wales UK

Tafarn Lleiaf Cymru – The Smallest Pub in Wales


The Smugglers Cove, Royal Albert Dock, Gower Street, Liverpool, Merseyside, England UK


The One O’Clock Gun, Britannia Pavilion, Royal Albert Dock, Gower Street, Liverpool, Merseyside, England UK


Turncoat Bar, Salthouse Quay, Royal Albert Dock, Liverpool, Merseyside, England UK


Revolution, Royal Albert Dock, Salthouse Quay, Liverpool, Merseyside, England UK


White Lion, Bridge Gate, Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire, England UK

Built in 1657 the pub is reputed to be the oldest building in town. We spent a few days here.


The White Swan, Bridge Gate, Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire, England UK


Crown Inn, Crown Street, Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire, England UK


The Albert, Albert Street, Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire, England UK


Shoulder of Mutton, Cnr St George’s Street & Bridge Gate, Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire, England UK


Old Gate, Old Gate, Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire, England UK


The Railway, New Road, Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire, England UK


Marshall’s Bar, Carlton Street, Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire, England UK


Elephant & Castle, Hollowgate, Holmfirth, West Yorkshire, England UK


General Havelock Inn, Ratcliffe Road, Haydon Bridge, Northumberland, England UK


The Railway Hotel, Church Street, Haydon Bridge, Northumberland, England UK

We stayed here for a few days in Haydon Bridge


Anchor Hotel, John Martin Street, Haydon Bridge, Northumberland, England UK


The Kings Head, Market Place, Allendale Town, Hexham, Northumberland, England UK


The Hawes Inn, Newhalls Road, South Queensferry, West Lothian, Scotland UK

This is where we stayed for a few days in South Queensferry – right beneath the famous Firth of Forth Rail Bridge


The Staghead Hotel, High Street, South Queensferry, West Lothian, Scotland UK


The Ferry Tap, High Street, South Queensferry, West Lothian, Scotland UK


Orocco Pier, High Street, South Queensferry, West Lothian, Scotland UK


No. 12, Quality Street, North Berwick, East Lothian, Scotland UK


The Eagle Inn, High Street, Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland UK


The Bear & Bull, High Street, Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland UK


The Ship Inn, Front Street, Lindisfarne, Holy Island, Northumberland, England UK


The George, Bondgate Within, Alnwick, Northumberland, England UK


Ye Olde Reine Deer Inn, Parsons Street, Banbury, Oxfordshire, England UK


The Old Auctioneer, Parsons Street, Banbury, Oxfordshire, England UK


Horse & Jockey, West Bar Street, Banbury, Oxfordshire, England UK


The Cromwell Lodge, North Bar Street, Banbury, Oxfordshire, England UK


Dog & Gun, North Bar Street, Banbury, Oxfordshire, England UK


The Coach & Horses, Butcher’s Row, Banbury, Oxfordshire, England UK


Banbury Cross, Butcher’s Row, Banbury, Oxfordshire, England UK


The Bell, Junction Oddington Road, Lower Park Street, Park Street, Maugersbury Road, Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire, England UK


The Lamb & Lion, Lower Borough Walls, Bath, Somerset, England UK


The Black Fox, Junction of Lower Borough Walls, Saint James’s Parade & Hot Bath Street, Bath, Somerset, England UK

Our pub stay while in Bath


London, United Kingdom 2019 XII

My last day in London involved walking to Hammersmith Bridge and then alongside the Thames River to Albert Bridge and return. Quite a walk I can tell you!

(Remember – all photos will open in a separate window and all photos are geotagged)


“COFX” Coffee Shop, Fulham Palace Road, Hammersmith, London, England UK


Chapel, Fulham Cemetery, Fulham Palace Road, Hammersmith


Victorian Residences, Fulham Palace Road, Hammersmith


Victorian Residential Properties, Fulham Palace Road, Hammersmith

[Open image in new window for better view]

Most of these properties appear to be upstairs and downstairs flats. They are valued in the vicinity of £650k each. Properties here are:

Berkley House
Selbourne House
Beaufort House
Sutherland House
Shaftesbury House
Salisbury House


Kings Arms, 425 New Kings Road, Fulham

Once known as “Larrik Inn”


The Temperance Pub & Kitchen, 90 Fulham High Street, Fulham


War Memorial, All Saints Church Grounds, Pryors Bank, Bishops Park, Fulham

War Memorial Sculptor: Alfred Turner


All Saints Church, Pryors Bank, Bishops Park, Fulham


Putney Bridge & River Thames, Fulham


Bridge Lamps, Putney Bridge, Fulham


Hopper Barge ACB Phoebe, River Thames, Putney

Hopper barges used to safely transport the spoil excavation from the Thames Tideway Tunnel project, a 25 km super sewer running mostly under the tidal section of the River Thames across Inner London to capture, store and convey almost all the raw sewage and rainwater that currently overflows into the Thames.


St Mary’s Church, Putney High Street, Putney, London, England UK


The White Lion, Putney High Street, Putney

Grade II Listed public house built in 1887. It later became a Slug and Lettuce chain pub, then The Litten Tree, then a Walkabout chain pub, then Wahoo, a sports bar. As of June 2019, it has been empty for over six years.


War Memorial, Putney High Street, Putney


The Boathouse, Brewhouse Lane, Putney


River Access, River Thames, Putney


Putney Bridge, River Thames, Putney


Fulham Railway Bridge, River Thames, Putney


“Motherfigure” by Alan Thornhill, Deodar Road, Putney


Yellow House, Deodar Road, Putney


“ER VII” Mailbox, Deodar Road, Putney


Thornhill House, 78 Deodar Road, Putney

Recently on the market for Guide price £2,650,000 (See Advertisement)


Wandsworth Park, Putney Bridge Road, Wandsworth


Battersea Bridge, River Thames, Battersea

In 1879 the original and dangerous wooden bridge was taken into public ownership, and in 1885 demolished and replaced with the existing bridge, designed by Sir Joseph Bazalgette the man responsible for the revolutionary London Sewer system. . It is the narrowest surviving road bridge over the Thames in London, it is one of London’s least busy Thames bridges. The location on a bend in the river makes the bridge a hazard to shipping, and it has been closed many times due to collisions.


Albert Bridge, River Thames, Battersea

This Grade II Listed bridge crosses over the Tideway of the River Thames connecting Chelsea in Central London on the north, left bank to Battersea on the south. It was built as a toll bridge and operated as such for 6 years.

The toll booths are the only surviving booths in London today.



London, United Kingdom. 2019 XI

Continuing the Hammersmith walk.

(Remember – all photos will open in a separate window and all photos are geotagged)


Girls Entrance Gate, Old School Building, St Dunstan’s Road, Hammersmith

Boys Entrance Gate, Old School Building, St Dunstan’s Road, Hammersmith


Residential Block, Gliddon Road, Hammersmith


Beryl Road, Hammersmith


Residential, Margravine Gardens, Hammersmith


59 & 61 Margravine Gardens, Hammersmith


Barons Court Railway Station, Margravine Gardens, Hammersmith


St Paul’s Studios, Talgarth Road, Hammersmith

**Look inside one of the studios**

**Street View from Google**


Rik Mayall Memorial Bench, Hammersmith Bridge Road, Hammersmith

** News Article **


St Paul’s Hammersmith, Queen Caroline Street, Hammersmith

The original church dated to 1629 but in 1880 a decision was made to rebuild it to allow it to a growing congregation and update its appearance. A significant portion of its land and graveyard were reclaimed in 1957 to build Great West Road and the Hammersmith Flyover.


Old Drinking Fountain, Hammersmith Bridge Road, Hammersmith


Digby Mansions, Hammersmith Bridge Road, Hammersmith


Jetty, River Thames, Lower Mall, Hammersmith


Entrance, Kent House, 10 Lower Mall, Hammersmith

Built in 1762, was first known as the Mansion House and was the home of the Hammersmith Working Men’s Club for the next 150 years. It became a boys’ school in the early C19th because it was felt its airy spaciousness was well adapted for the accommodation of young gentlemen. The house was owned by the Hammersmith Club Society for many years, whose members enjoyed its elegant interior, including ballroom, theatre and snooker hall.

It is now the premises of the Hammersmith Club, with half of the building available as a private hire venue, and the rest available to the traditional members.


Furnivall Sculling Club, Lower Mall, Hammersmith

Furnivall Sculling Club was founded as Hammersmith Sculling Club in 1896 by Dr Frederick James Furnivall, and it was originally a club for women only. It opened its doors to men in 1901.


River Moorings, River Thames, Lower Mall, Hammersmith


Waterman’s Cottage, No. 20 Lower Mall, Hammersmith


Floating Debris, River Thames, Hammersmith, London, England UK


Westcott Lodge, Lower Mall, Hammersmith

A Georgian building c.1746 and originally built as Turret House in the late-C17th and was once the official vicarage for the incumbent of St Paul’s Church.


Furnival Gardens, Lower Mall, Hammersmith

Furnivall Gardens was created in 1936 after clearance of the old Hammersmith Creek and its cluster of industry and commerce.

Hammersmith Creek was a spur from the Stamford Brook and once linked the Thames to King Street. The only evidence of this once thriving waterway is an outlet in the river wall, towards the upstream end of Furnivall Gardens – named after Dr Frederick Furnivall who founded the sculling club for women on Lower Mall.

In about 1780, Joseph Cromwell founded the Hammersmith Brewery alongside The Creek near King Street. The western side became monopolised with malt houses, built to serve the brewery, and the area became increasingly populated. The Creek was a magnet for traders and watermen of all professions. The waterway, navigable by barge, was crossed by the High Bridge, rebuilt in the early C18th, and also known as Bishop’s Bridge. This feature is still marked by a raised hump in the gardens and a flowerbed.

The only other remaining connection with the Creek is the Friends’ Memorial Garden, on the site of an old Friends’ Meeting House. The Quaker movement had gained popularity in Hammersmith and established its Meeting House close to the Creek in the late C17th. Both the Meeting House and the Caretaker’s Cottage were late C18th. They were bombed during the last war and in 1955 were rebuilt on the north side of the Great West Road. The little garden surrounded by a low wall remains historically important to the movement and marks its old burial ground which, in line with Friends’ traditions, never featured memorial stones.


Entrance, Beach House, 7 Lower Mall, Hammersmith

An old property dating to 1734 was demolished to make way for this property in 1811. This property (No.7) and No. 6 were recorded in 1865 as beonging to Rev. Peter King-Salter.


Garden Gate, Lower Mall, Hammersmith


Statue, Lancelot Capability Brown, Thames Path, Hammersmith

Inscription:

The Hammersmith Society
Lancelot Capability Brown
1716-1783
Father of the English Landscape Garden
Lived by the river in Hammersmith 1751-1764
Sculptor: Laury Dizengremel


“Figurehead”, Thames Path, Hammersmith, London, England UK


Harrods Furniture Depository, Barnes

Built on the site of an old soap factory in 1894 to store items too large for their Knightsbridge store is now a residential estate consisting of 250 townhouses and penthouse suites known as “Harrods Village”.

Properties in the “Village” don’t come cheap with many in excess of £1 million. The pentouse sold for £6,500,000 in 2010.


Entrance, Brandenburgh House, 116 Fulham Palace Road, Hammersmith

Brandenburgh House was built in the Arts and Crafts style in 1905 by Henry Saxon Snell as a nurses’ home for Fulham Infirmary.


Road Name Sign, Manbre Road, Hammersmith


King George V Postbox, Margravine Road, Hammersmith

King George V – reigned 1910-1936


Entrance, 51 Winslow Road, Hammersmith


62 & 64 St Dunstan’s Road, Hammersmith



London, United Kingdom. 2019 X

After returning from Italy, I spent the last couple of days wandering about Hammersmith in London.


Entrance Gates & West Lodge, Margravine Cemetery, Margravine Road, Hammersmith, London, England UK

Opened in 1868 on a site previously occupied by market gardens and orchards, known as Fulham Fields. The first burial took place on 3 November 1869 and closed for new burials in 1951.

The cemetery grounds are also the location of a War Memorial.


Lyons and Company First World War Memorial, Margravine Cemetery, Margravine Road, Hammersmith

See the story of Lyons and Company


Memorial, George Thomas Brown & Amelia Brown, Margravine Cemetery


Memorial, John Francis Taylor Ware, “Little John” – Margravine Cemetery

Died 11 December 1904 – Aged 6.


Memorial, George Robert Broad & Caroline Broad, Margravine Cemetery


In Memory, Abraham George Smith, Margravine Cemetery


In Memory, James Frederick Fletcher, Margravine Cemetery


Memorial Wall, Margravine Cemetery

Inscribed: Those Honoured Here Dies in the Service of Their Country and Lie Buried Elsewhere in this Cemetery


A Child’s Grave, Margravine Cemetery

In Loving Memory of George J Dyett Jan 5, 1882 Aged 5 months also his Father William Dyett 7 Jan 1904


The Parker Family, Margravine Cemetery


Squirrels, Margravine Cemetery


Cemetery Grounds, Margravine Cemetery


Chapel, Margravine Cemetery


Hammersmith Bridge, River Thames, Hammersmith

This is the second Hammersmith Bridge, built on the pillars of the first which had opened in 1828.

At the turn of the 19th century Hammersmith was still a hamlet of Fulham. To cross the river you had to use the ferry service at either Chiswick Mall or at Ferry Lane in Barnes. A bridge to cross the river at Hammersmith had been mooted for many years and, once an approach road on the Surrey side had been established, the Hammersmith Bridge Company was formed and a brief for an iron bridge was drawn up.

The brief was fulfilled by William Tierney Clark in 1824 when he designed a “bridge of suspension with a view to the strictest economy”. Clark was a respected engineer, apprenticed at one time to Thomas Telford. He designed part of the West Middlesex Waterworks nearby, where he lived and worked as chief engineer.

He was appointed to work as consulting engineer on the bridge, and there is a fine memorial to him on the North Wall of St Paul’s Church, Hammersmith, depicting the original bridge. The foundation stone was laid on 7th May, 1825, by the Duke of Sussex (Not Harry!) and it was opened in October 1827 to a fanfare of fireworks and music. The Bridge was a wonder of its time, an impressive feat of engineering and described as ‘as handsome as it was useful’. It had two large York stone arches and graceful white chains and ironwork. At each end were a pair of toll houses, painted white and manned by liveried toll men managing the passage of people and livestock.

It was a huge success and justly received much admiration, but it was not terribly practical. The walkways ended at the arches so that pedestrians had to join the busy carriageway, and it was also rather narrow. The Toll was scrapped in 1880 and the huge increase in traffic put a strain on the already inadequate structure. It was decided to re-build the bridge rather than repair it and so the bridge was replaced.

Sir Joseph Bazalgette was Chief Engineer to the Metropolitan Board of Works from 1858-1889, during which time he designed new bridges at Hammersmith, Putney and Battersea, oversaw the construction of the Thames Embankment and built 83 miles of intercepting sewers throughout London. In 1877 he began to question the safety of the original Hammersmith Bridge and recommended that urgent repairs take place. After 1880, when the toll was scrapped and traffic increased, the repairs became even more urgent. In fact in November 1881, Police Constable Bullock was leaving the footway to pass through the tower arch on the Barnes side and he fell through a hole in the footway into the river!

After a full assessment it was decided to re-build the bridge and a design by Bazalgette was approved. Traffic was diverted onto a temporary wooden bridge in 1885 and works began. The new bridge was opened by Prince Albert Victor of Wales in June, 1887. However, it was built on the same piers as the previous bridge and is therefore of the same narrow dimensions and unsuitable for heavy loads. Inevitably, and again, this bridge too has proved insufficient to cope with modern traffic; a weight and width restriction has been imposed. Nevertheless, the bridge is an attractive feature in the river landscape, traditionally painted green and gold with colourful coats of arms.

There was an attempt to destroy it by the IRA in March 1939, mainly averted by the quick thinking of a pedestrian who threw the bomb, in a case, into the river where it exploded, damaging one of the pillars, and more recently in 2000. The bridge has had to be closed to traffic for structural repairs, which creates a backwater from what are generally very busy approach roads. It is currently closed to all traffic both motorised and pedestrian and it is expected to take another six years to effect repairs. (Announced Mar 2021)


The Blue Anchor, Lower Mall, Hammersmith

Originally titled the Blew Anchor, this is one of the area’s oldest pubs, licensed in 1722 but probably on the site for many years before. It was a popular watering hole of watermen.


The Old City Arms, 107 Hammersmith Bridge Road, Hammersmith, est: 1827


Rutland Arms, 15 Lower Mall, Hammersmith

Built in 1849 and lost its top floor and balcony during the German bombing of London during “The Blitz”.

Pre-bombing image:-


Lower Mall, Hammersmith


The Pear Tree, Margravine Road, Hammersmith



Triptychs

I decided to try my hand at something different….. this is the result!

All images are geotagged and hyperlinked to open full screen. To view them on a map, save the image to your hard drive and then download this FREE SOFTWARE. Install and click on the image in the left panel to view in a map as to the location where it was taken.  (SAMPLE VIEW)

Fimiston Open Pit, Fimiston, Kalgoorlie-Boulder, Western Australia

The pit is oblong in plan view and is approximately 3.5 kilometres long, 1.5 kilometres wide and over 600 metres deep. Until 2016 it was Australia’s largest open cut gold mine now surpassed by Newmont’s Boddington gold mine also in Western Australia.

“The Swilkie”, Pentland Firth, Orkney Islands, Scotland UK

‘The Swilkie’ is the most dangerous whirlpool in the Pentland Firth. It is occasioned by the meeting of four or five contrary tides. According to Icelandic legend, the Swilkie is the place where the salt which maintains the saltiness of the oceans is ground in a giant quern, stolen from King Frodi by a sea-king named Mysing. When Mysing’s longship sank off Stroma under the weight of it, he still continued to grind away with it 15 fathoms down and to this day the sea can still be heard roaring through it.

‘The Swilkie” is off the northern coast of the Island of Stroma.

Bungee Jumper, Korintos Isthmus Bridge, Corinth Canal, Loutraki, Greece

Submersible Bridge (Isthmia Bridge), Corinth Canal, Isthmus of Corinth, Greece

The bridge at the Isthmia end of the canal submerges into the water to allow ships to enter or leave the canal.

Imerovigli, Santorini, Greece

The unit we stayed in for a few days is in the foreground – the first half-wall in the top right square.

Stadium, Ithoni, Ancient Messene, Greece

View Across Messian Gulf, Koroni, Greece

This is the view from the house where we stayed.

Panorama, Via del Voltone, San Marino, San Marino

Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich Peninsula, Greenwich, London, England UK

London, United Kingdom. 2019 IX

Window & Doorway, The Jewel Tower, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Spiral Stairway, The Jewel Tower, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Corner of The Jewel Tower & Old Palace Yard Residential Building, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

The Jewel Tower, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

The Jewel Tower is a 14th-century surviving element of the Palace of Westminster, in London, England. It was built between 1365 and 1366 to house the personal treasure of King Edward III. The original Tower was a three-storey, crenellated stone building which occupied a secluded part of the Palace and was protected by a moat linked to the River Thames. The ground floor featured elaborate sculpted vaulting, described by historian Jeremy Ashbee as “an architectural masterpiece”. The Tower continued to be used for storing the monarch’s treasure and personal possessions until 1512, when a fire in the Palace caused King Henry VIII to relocate his court to the nearby Palace of Whitehall.

Police Presence, Old Palace Yard, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

BREXIT Protest, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

“‘ello, ‘ello, ‘ello, ‘ello, ‘ello!”, Police Patrol, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

House of Lords, Palace of Westminster, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Government Offices, 100 Parliament Street, Westminster, London, England UK

St Stephen’s Tavern, 10 Bridge Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Street Performer, Bridge Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Big Ben & Elizabeth Tower Maintenance, Palace of Westminster, Westminster, London, England UK

Big Ben is the nickname for the Great Bell of the striking clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London and is usually extended to refer to both the clock and the clock tower. The official name of the tower in which Big Ben is located was originally the Clock Tower, but it was renamed Elizabeth Tower in 2012 to mark the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II. On 21 August 2017, a four-year schedule of renovation works began on the tower, which are to include the addition of a lift. There are also plans to re-glaze and repaint the clock dials. With a few exceptions, such as New Year’s Eve and Remembrance Sunday, the bells are to be silent until the work is completed in 2021.

“Boadicea and Her Daughters”, Victoria Embankment, Westminster, London, England UK

Boadicea and Her Daughters is a bronze sculptural group in London representing Boudica, queen of the Celtic Iceni tribe, who led an uprising in Roman Britain. It is located to the north side of the western end of Westminster Bridge, near Portcullis House and Westminster Pier, facing Big Ben and the Palace of Westminster across the road. It is considered the magnum opus of its sculptor, the English artist and engineer Thomas Thornycroft. Thornycroft worked on it from 1856 until shortly before his death in 1885, sometimes assisted by his son William Hamo Thornycroft, but it was not erected in its current position until 1902.

Tube Entrance, Westminster Underground Station, Victoria Embankment, Westminster, London, England UK

Across The Thames, Victoria Embankment to Queen’s Walk, Westminster, London, England UK

Panorama From London Eye to Westminster Bridge, Victoria Embankment, Westminster, London, England UK

Vintage Bridge Lamps, Westminster Bridge, Westminster, London, England UK

Bagpiping Busker, Westminster Bridge, Westminster, London, England UK

“South Bank Lion”, South Bank, London, England UK

The South Bank Lion, also known as the Red Lion, is a Coade stone sculpture of a standing male lion cast in 1837. It has stood at the east end of Westminster Bridge in London, to the north side of the bridge beside County Hall, since 1966. Painted red between 1951 and 1966, the paint was later removed to reveal again the white ceramic surface underneath.

Westminster Bridge, Westminster Bridge Road, Bishop’s, London, England UK

Archway, London Marriott Hotel, County Hall, Westminster Bridge Road, Bishop’s London, England UK

50 Blackheath Road, Greenwich, London, England UK

84 Blackheath Road, Greenwich, London, England UK

Advertising Sign, Papyrus House, Blackheath Hill, Greenwich, London, England UK

Stone Carving, The George & Dragon, Cnr Blackheath Hill & Lewisham Road, Greenwich, London, England UK

Side Door, The George & Dragon, Cnr Blackheath Hill & Lewisham Road, Greenwich, London, England UK

“Rainbow” Pub, The George & Dragon, Cnr Blackheath Hill & Lewisham Road, Greenwich, London, England UK

“Duver Court”, 12 Blackheath Hill, Greenwich, London, England UK

(Duver - not Dover)

Don’t forget, there are nearly 6,000 images of mine to be viewed on my Flickr site.

NEXT STOP – ICELAND!

Skógafoss Waterfall, Skógarfoss, Iceland

London, United Kingdom. 2019 VIII

Methodist Central Hall, Storey’s Gate, Westminster, London, England UK

The Sanctuary, Westminster, London, England UK

Bagpiping Busker, Broad Sanctuary, Westminster, London, England UK

Westminster Abbey, Broad Sanctuary, Westminster, London, England UK

Statue of Nelson Mandela, Parliament Square, Westminster, London, England UK

Statue of Robert Peel, Parliament Square, Westminster, London, England UK

Robert Peel was Prime Minister of the UK from 1841 – 1846. The statue was commissioned in 1876.

Statue of Mahatma Gandhi, Parliament Square, Westminster, London, England UK

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian lawyer, anti-colonial nationalist, and political ethicist, who employed nonviolent resistance to lead the successful campaign for India’s independence from British Rule, and in turn inspire movements for civil rights and freedom across the world.

Statue of Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, Parliament Square, Westminster, London, England UK

Prime Minister of UK 1868 & 1874 – 1880. Commissioned in 1883.

Statue of Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett, Parliament Square, Westminster, London, England UK

Millicent Fawcett (1847 – 1929) was an English political leader, activist and writer. Known as a tireless campaigner for women’s suffrage via legislative change, from 1897 until 1919 she led Britain’s largest women’s rights organisation, the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies (NUWSS). She would famously write: “I cannot say I became a suffragist. I always was one, from the time I was old enough to think at all about the principles of Representative Government.” Fawcett also sought to improve women’s chances of higher education, serving as a governor of Bedford College, London and a co-founder of Newnham College, Cambridge in 1875. In 2018, 100 years after the passing of the Representation of the People Act, Millicent Garrett Fawcett became the first woman to be commemorated with a statue in Parliament Square.

Statue of Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, Parliament Square, Westminster, London, England UK

Prime Minister of UK 1852, 1858-1859, 1866-1868. Commissioned 1874.

Statue of George Canning, Parliament Square, Westminster, London, England UK

Was Prime Minister of UK for the final 118 days of his life. Commissioned in 1832.

Statue of Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston, Parliament Square, Westminster, London, England UK

B. 1784 D. 1865 – Prime Minister of UK 1855 – 1858, 1859 – 1865. Commissioned 1876.

Statue of Jan Christian Smuts, Parliament Square, Westminster, London, England UK

Field Marshal Jan Christian Smuts PC, OM, CH, DTD, ED, KC, FRS (24 May 1870 – 11 September 1950) was a South African statesman, military leader, and philosopher. He was Prime Minister of the Union of South Africa from 1919 until 1924 and from 1939 until 1948.

Statue of David Lloyd George, Parliament Square, Westminster, London, England UK

David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom between 1916 and 1922. He was the final Liberal to hold the post.

Statue of Sir Winston Churchill, Parliament Square, Westminster, London, England UK

The Right Honourable
Sir Winston Churchill
KG OM CH TD DL FRS RA
He was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945, when he led Britain to victory in the Second World War, and again from 1951 to 1955. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as a Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and imperialist, for most of his career he was a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but from 1904 to 1924 was a member of the Liberal Party.

Government Buildings, Cnr Great George Street & Parliament Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Doorways, St Margaret’s Church, St Margaret Street, Westminster, London, England UK


Victoria Tower, Palace of Westminster, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Westminster Abbey, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Statue of George V, Old Palace Yard, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

George V, King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India. 1910 – 1936

The statue was sculpted prior to World War II in a quarry in Portland UK. It was hidden there until after ther war. The statue was placed in the original proposed spot opposite the House of Lords, which required the demolition of No. 5 Old Palace Yard. It was unveiled by King George VI, on 22 October 1947 and was attended by Queen Elizabeth, Queen Mary, and Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret.

Preparing for Brexit Protest, Abingdon Street, Westminster. London, England UK

The Jewel Tower, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

The Jewel Tower is a 14th-century surviving element of the Palace of Westminster, in London, England. It was built between 1365 and 1366 to house the personal treasure of King Edward III. The original Tower was a three-storey, crenellated stone building which occupied a secluded part of the Palace and was protected by a moat linked to the River Thames. The ground floor featured elaborate sculpted vaulting, described by historian Jeremy Ashbee as “an architectural masterpiece”. The Tower continued to be used for storing the monarch’s treasure and personal possessions until 1512, when a fire in the Palace caused King Henry VIII to relocate his court to the nearby Palace of Whitehall.

Vaulting, The Jewel Tower, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Internal Doors, The Jewel Tower, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Windows, The Jewel Tower, Abingdon Street, Westminster, London, England UK

London, United Kingdom. 2019 VII

Entrance Gwydyr House, 26 Whitehall, Westminster, London, England UK

A mansion built in 1772 at a cast of £6,000. It is currently used as the Office of Secretary of State for Wales.

This entrance was featured as the fictional Department for Administrative Affairs in the BBC sitcom Yes Minister.

Cnr of Gwydyr House, 26 Whitehall, Westminster, London, England UK

Memorial to The Women of World War II, Whitehall, Westminster, London, England UK

Vintage Street Lamp, Whitehall, Westminster, London, England UK

(That’s “MONTY” in the background)

Gates, Ministry of Defence, Whitehall, Westminster, London, England UK

The Cenotaph, Whitehall, Westminster, London, England UK

The Cenotaph is a war memorial on Whitehall in London, England. Its origin is in a temporary structure erected for a peace parade following the end of the First World War, and after an outpouring of national sentiment it was replaced in 1920 by a permanent structure and designated the United Kingdom’s official national war memorial.

Close Parking, Police Vehicles, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Doorway to Former Grindlay’s Bank, 54 Parliament Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Doorway, 53 Parliament Street, Westminster, London, England UK

The Red Lion, Cnr Parliament Street & Derby Gate, Westminster, London, England UK

Empty Coffee Cup, The Red Lion, Cnr Parliament Street & Derby Gate, Westminster, London, England UK

Triple Arched Bridge Entrance to King Charles Street, Parliament Street, Westminster, London, England UK

This enclosed bridge, added in 1908 , links the New Government Offices (Treasury) of 1898 and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office of 1875.

Street Sign, Parliament Street – Whitehall SW1, Westminster, London, England UK

Doorway, Foreign & Commonwealth Office, Parliament Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Window Pillar, Foreign & Commonwealth Office, Parliament Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Entrance to Downing Street, Westminster, London, England UK

(Residence of the Prime Minister)

Mounted Police Patrol, Parliament Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Sign to Cabinet War Rooms, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Doorway, Foreign & Commonwealth Office, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Ornate Railing, Foreign & Commonwealth Office, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Gate, Foreign & Commonwealth Office, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Doorknob, Government Building, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Doorway, Government Building, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Vintage Street Lamp, King Charles Street, Westminster, London, England UK

“Clive of India”, Clive Steps, King Charles Street, Westminister, London, England UK

Major-General Robert Clive, 1st Baron Clive, KB, FRS (29 September 1725 – 22 November 1774), was the first British Governor of the Bengal Presidency. He began as a British military officer and East India Company (EIC) official who established the military and political supremacy of the EIC by seizing control of Bengal and eventually the whole of the Indian subcontinent and Myanmar.

The statue was unveiled in 1912 outside Gwydyr House, also in Whitehall, and was moved to its current location in 1916.

Institution of Civil Engineers, Great George Street, Westminster, London, England UK

Street, Sign. Great George Street SW1, Westminster, London, England UK

The Westminster Arms, Storey’s Gate, Westminster, London, England UK

Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England UK